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The Park is now open for RV, trailer, tent and horse camping. 

The lower 50 acres are now open for day use.  

That includes: the lower 9 hole disc golf range, the horse arena, round pen and trails course, the Martha Walker Native Plant Garden, the archery range and biking or hiking on the lower flat 50 acres ONLY.

The upper 800 acres are closed

to all day use for safety reasons.

We will update the web site weekly.  

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Welcome to the Skyline Wilderness Park 

 nestled in the foothills of the beautiful Napa Valley.  We have many activities and features here to help you get back to nature and see part of our valley as nature intended it.  No matter what you came for, be it Trails (Hiking, Horseback or Bikes), The Martha Walker Garden, Disc Golf or just to Picnic. You will be able to relax and enjoy yourself.

 


We are always looking for volunteers!
If you're interested, contact us at info@skylinepark.org.

 





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Birds Found in the Garden and in the Park

All descriptions from Stokes Field Guide to Birds

 

Carduelis pinus
Forages on the ground and in foliage for conifer cone seeds, weed seeds, insects, flower buds, and nectar. Comes to bird feeders, sometimes in large numbers, for sunflower and thistle.

Nest of grasses, twigs, rootlets, bark strips, and lichens lined with feathers, fur, and rootlets, placed in tree branch 3-50 ft. above the ground

Irruptive species. Seen in large numbers in some years. Often found with goldfinches.


Sitta carolinensis
Creeps headfirst down tree trunks. Eats nuts, acorns, and insects. Comes to bird feeders for suet and sunflower seeds.

Nest of twigs, bark shreds, fur, and hair, placed in natural cavity, birdhouse, or abandoned woodpecker hole 15-50 ft. above the ground.

Nuthatches are best known for their habit of storing food in bark crevices and their ability to move headfirst down trees, enabling them to find food that "right-side up" birds, like woodpeckers, might miss.Courtship begins in winter with the male singing. He does mate feeding (presenting female with food) through the incubation phase.


Melanerpes formicivorus
Eats insects, tree sap, and fruit. Caches acorns and other nuts in holes drilled in trees, utility poles, even buildings; 1 commercial group can store 50,000 nuts in a season. Will come to suet and seed at feeders.

Nests in colonies. Excavates nesting cavity in dead or live tree, usually an oak, 6-25 ft. above the ground.

Lives in communal groups and breeds cooperatively in parts of range. Groups are composed of up to 4 breeding males, 1-2 breeding females, and up to 10 offspring of preceding years. All group members help with excavating nest and with feeding and brooding young. Some birds in Arizona do not nest communally or store acorns.


Selasphorus sasin
Eats nectar, insects; visits hummingbird feeders.

Nest of moss, dried weed stems, willow down, animal hair, feathers, tied together with spider's silk; placed straddling a branch of bush or vine. May rebuild over old nest.

Male does spectacular U-shaped dive display, rising up 25 ft. on each side. After several swings, he spirals 75-100 ft. high, then dives, making a rough whistling sound at bottom. Done toward females and territorial intruders. Females raise young alone, nesting well away from males' territories. In some cases, female lays eggs while nest is just shallow cup, then continues to add material to nest until young fledge.


Meleagris gallopavo
Feeds on the ground, eating nuts, acorns, and seeds. Also eats grains, vegetation, insects, frogs, lizards.

Nest is placed in a natural or scraped depression and lined with leaves and grasses.

Spends the winter in same or mixed sex flock. In courtship, male struts and gobbles with tail fanned. Female responds with yelping call. Male may mate with many females. Female raises young.


Carduelis psaltria
Eats wide variety of seeds from trees, weeds, grasses, also flower buds and berries. Comes to bird feeders for sunflower and thistle.

Nest of bark, moss, and plant stems lined with feathers, cotton, and plant down, placed in shrub or tree 2-30 ft. above the ground.

Found in small to large flocks in winter, often along with other goldfinches, Pine Siskins, and Dickcissels. Drawn to habitats that include a good water source.

 

Blackbird

Brewer's
Red-Winged

 

Bluebird, Western

Bunting, Lazuli

Bushtit

Chickadee, Chestnut-backed

Cowbird, Brown-headed

Coot, American

Cormorant, Double-crested

Creeper, Brown

Crow, American

Dove

Mourning
Rock

 

Duck

Pintail
Wood

 

Eagle

Bald
Golden

 

Egret

Great
Snowey

 

Falcon, Peregrine

Finch

House
Purple

 

 Flicker, Northern

Flycatcher

Ash-throated
Pacific-slope

 

Goldfinch

American
Lesser

 

Goose, Canada

Grackel, Great-tailed

Grebe, Pied-billed

Grosbeak, Black-headed

Gull

Ring-billed
Western

 

Harrier, Northern

Hawk

Cooper's
Red-shouldered
Red-tailed
Sharp-shinned

 

Heron

Black-crowned night
Great Blue
Green

 

Hummingbird

Allen's
Anna's
Bkack-chinned

 

Jay

Steller's
Western Srrub

 

Junco, Dark-eyed

Kestrel, American

Killdeer

Kingbird, Western

Kingfisher, Belted

Kinglet

Golden-crowned
Ruby-crowned

 

Kite, White-tailed

Mallard

Mockingbird, Northern

Nuthatch

Red-breasted

White-breasted

 

Oriole

Bullock's

Hooded

 

Osprey

Owl

Barn

Greathorned

Western Screech

Northern pygmy

 

Phoebe

Black

Say's

 

Quail, California

Raven, Common

Robin, American

Sandpiper, Spotted

Sapsucker, Red-breasted

Siskin, Pine

Sparrow

Fox

Golden-crowned

House

Song

White-crowned

 

Starling, European

Swallow

Barn

Cliff

Tree

Violet-green

 

Tanager, Western

Tern, Caspian

Thrasher, California

Thrush

Hermit

Varied

 

Titmouse, Oak

Towhee

California

Spotted

 

Turkey, Wild

Vireo, Hutton's

Vulture, Turkey

Warbler

Orange-crowned

Townsend's

Wilson's

Yellow

Yellow-rumped

 

Waxwing, Cedar

Woodpecker

Acorn

Downey

Hairy

Nuttail's

Pileated

 

Wren

Bewick's

House

Winter

 


Wrentit 

 

Park History

In 1979, the land beside the State Hospital was declared to be surplus and was to be sold to private people. A group of concerned citizens got together and enlisted the help of various members of the community and government to allow our group to use the land as a park for the Napa Valley. The idea of a park was formed, a constitution was created, incorporation papers drafted, environmental impact studies made, etc.. Since there has never been a private sector leasing state land for a park system, the State leased the land to the County of Napa which then subleased it to the Skyline Park Citizens Association. Plans were made for what the Association wanted to accomplish (these plans are revised every 5 years and submitted for approval to the State).

Bond monies were available for initial fence construction, parking areas, building of the Kiosk, sewer system and bathrooms. Later on, more bond money became available for the conversion of an old barn into our present Social Center. The Park opened April 5, 1983.

The Park was open to hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders. Trails throughout the Park were constructed.

Later additions included an RV camp area, a tent camping area, a picnic area complete with a cook shack. Local horseman proposed a riding arena, show office and bleachers, and money was raised to construct these. Now, Skyline holds a series of horseshows each year. 4-H and other youth groups also use the arena for various events.

 

As time went on, the California Native Plant Society moved into the Park, erected an area where they could cultivate native plants, and in time, constructed the Martha Walker Gardens. This garden in now known all over the State and is a popular place for school groups to visit.  See our article on the Garden for more information - http://skylinepark.org/martha-walker-nature-garden

Hiking in the Park is an all-year activity which changes with the seasons. Wildflowers paint the hills in the spring, fields of golden grasses appear in the summer and fall. Abundant wildlife all year long.
Horseback Riding, there are many beautiful vistas from 16 miles of riding trails. These vistas include Mt. Tamalpais, Mt. St. Helena, Mt. George, North San Francisco Bay and the Napa Valley
Bicycling on the Park's 16 miles trail system can be very challenging. An exhilarating ride over creeks and through flowered meadows will bring you back again and again.

The Silverado Archery Club moved onto the grounds and has set up a 42 target NFAA approved field range.

In later years, the Napa Disc Golf Club has constructed an 18 hole Disc Golf course.

Skyline Wilderness Park is available for hiking, horseback riding, bicycling, camping, picnicking, nature study, fishing, archery and disc golf.

The Park is also available for group picnics, RV clubs and camping events. The Park has hosted Boy and Girl Scout activities of various kinds. School groups can use the Park for nature study and school sponsored outings. Individuals and organizations can rent the picnic areas for parties, weddings, etc.

 

Skyline has hosted the Civil War re-enactments many times in the past, as well as the local and regional SCA groups who re-create medieval life and are open to the public.  There have been several music festivals and even a Earth Day Event held at the Park.

Bicycle clubs have held a number of races through the trail system including the World Bike Cup Race on 3 occasions.

Park Information

Skyline Wilderness Park
2201 Imola Ave.
Napa, CA 94559
707-252-0481

Hours of Operation

Open 7 days a week

Winter Hours 
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

 

ALL park users should be out of the park by closing time.

No admittance to the park 30 minutes prior to closing time.

Trails - Call Kiosk for conditions: (707) 252-0481

Email -  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Welcome To The Skyline Park Website

Welcome to the Skyline Wideness Park website. Please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like to volunteer to help. Please enjoy all the activities we have to offer to the public from the Martha Walker Native Plants Garden, Disc Golf Course, Camping and Picnicing, and our many fabulous trails for Hiking, Biking and Horseback Riding.


We apologize but our site was recently hacked and we are in the process of rebuilding from scratch. We will be adding information as fast as we can. If you need assistance or information on the park, please call the Kisok at 707 252 0481 Park Hours are 8am to 6pm and starting November 2nd Winter Hours will be 8am to 5pm. No entry to park will be allowed 30 minutes prior to closing.